Psycho (Psycho #1)

About the Author: Robert Bloch

Robert Albert Bloch was a prolific American writer He was the son of Raphael Ray Bloch 1884, Chicago 1952, Chicago , a bank cashier, and his wife Stella Loeb 1880, Attica, Indiana 1944, Milwaukee, WI , a social worker, both of German Jewish descent.Bloch wrote hundreds of short stories and over twenty novels, usually crime fiction, science fiction, and, perhaps most influentially, horror fict Robert Albert Bloch was a prolific American writer He was the son of Raphael Ray Bloch 1884, Chicago 1952, Chicago , a bank cashier, and his wife Stella Loeb 1880, Attica, Indiana 1944, Milwaukee, WI , a social worker, both of German Jewish descent.Bloch wrote hundreds of short stories and over twenty novels, usually crime fiction, science fiction, and, perhaps most influentially, horror fiction Psycho He was one of the youngest members of the Lovecraft Circle Lovecraft was Bloch s mentor and one of the first to seriously encourage his talent.He was a contributor to pulp magazines such as Weird Tales in his early career, and was also a prolific screenwriter He was the recipient of the Hugo Award for his story That Hell Bound Train , the Bram Stoker Award, and the World Fantasy Award He served a term as president of the Mystery Writers of America.Robert Bloch was also a major contributor to science fiction fanzines and fandom in general In the 1940s, he created the humorous character Lefty Feep in a story for Fantastic Adventures He also worked for a time in local vaudeville, and tried to break into writing for nationally known performers He was a good friend of the science fiction writer Stanley G Weinbaum In the 1960 s, he wrote 3 stories for Star Trek


➡ Psycho (Psycho #1)  Ebook ➧ Author Robert Bloch – Onedayyourdayweddings.co.uk
  • Paperback
  • 208 pages
  • Psycho (Psycho #1)
  • Robert Bloch
  • English
  • 02 January 2017
  • 0747545251

Psycho (Psycho #1) It Was A Dark And Stormy Night When Mary Crane Glimpsed The Unlit Neon Sign Announcing The Vacancy At The Bates Motel Exhausted, Lost, And At The End Of Her Rope, She Was Eager For A Hot Shower And A Bed For The Night Her Room Was Musty But Clean And The Plumbing Worked Norman Bates, The Manager, Seemed Nice, If A Little Odd.

10 thoughts on “Psycho (Psycho #1)

  1. Kemper says:

    Nowadays, it seems like every horror movie is either a remake, a sequel or the kind of vile torture porn that makes you want to puke in your bag of popcorn Filming one of these flicks requires tens of millions of dollars for a platoon of pretty actors, gallons of fake blood, special effects and a marketing campaign Oddly, they don t seem to spend any money on scripts for these things.But Alfred Hitchcock only needed about nine grand to buy the rights to this book Then it only took a blonde, a Nowadays, it seems like every horror movie is either a remake, a sequel or the kind of vile torture porn that makes you want to puke in your bag of popcorn Filming one of these flicks requires tens of millions of dollars for a platoon of pretty actors, gallons of fake blood, special effects and a marketing campaign Oddly, they don t seem to spend any money on scripts for these things.But Alfred Hitchcock only needed about nine grand to buy the rights t...

  2. Raeleen Lemay says:

    ugh this was just so good.I really love how short this was, so there was never a dull moment I still haven t seen any of the movie adaptations but I can only imagine how fast paced they must be.I will say, I binge watched Bates Motel not too long ago and that s the main reason I picked this up, but I loved how different this was in a way Bates Motel took a little nugget from this book and turned it into a muchbroad scope world and story which was awesome and this story is just a tiny ugh this was just so good.I really love how short this was, so there was never a dull moment I still haven t seen any of the movie adaptations but I can only imagine how fast paced they must be.I will say, I binge watched Bates Motel not too long ago and that s the main reason I picked this up, but I loved how different this was in a way Bates Motel took a little nugget from this ...

  3. Dan Schwent says:

    When Mary Crane skips town with 40,000 of her boss s money, she drives and drives, bedding down at the Bates Motel She meets Norman Bates, who harbors secrets eveninteresting than stolen moneyEveryone knows the basic beats of Psycho due to the iconic Alfred Hitchcock film Woman gets knifed in the shower, psychotic mama s boy, etc When it popped up for ninety nine cents, I figured, what the hell Shooting Star Spiderweb was pretty good Psycho was definitely worth the buck.Inspired When Mary Crane skips town with 40,000 of her boss s money, she drives and drives, bedding down at the Bates Motel She meets Norman Bates, who harbors secrets eveninteresting than stolen moneyEveryone knows the basic beats of Psycho due to the ...

  4. Kelly (and the Book Boar) says:

    Find all of my reviews at Stars That s what I tell my boys all the time I hope they turn out just as friendly and loyal to their momma as Norman did.Is there anyone even on the planet who hasn t at least heard of Psycho before What can I say that you don t already know Well, I can confirm that this book is short at roughly 200 pages Due to its brevity, I can also say not a paragraph is wa...

  5. Lyn says:

    We all go a little crazy sometimes.My generation and everyone since has grown up with the concept of Psycho, stemming from Sir Alfred Hitchcock s 1960 thriller, but all this began with Robert Bloch s 1959 novel.Reading this after having seen the film and grown up with the story, I dealt with a fair amount of theatrical irony While the film stayed mostly true to Bloch s vision, there were some departures and these were enjoyable to experience Bloch s prose is tight and the atmosphere developed We all go a little crazy sometimes.My generation and everyone since has grown up with the concept of Psycho, stemming from Sir Alfred Hitchcock s 1960 thriller, but all this began with Robert Bloch s 1959 novel.Reading this after having seen the film and grown up with the story, I dealt with a fair amount of theatrical irony While the film stayed mostly true to Bloch s vision, there were some departures and these were enjoyable to experience Bloch s prose is tight and the atmosphere developed is intense and suspenseful I imagined the thrill of a reader in 1959 reading this narrative for the first time as it moved along in Bloch s masterful recitation and how surprising and thrilling some of the realizations must have been This is also a seminal work for the horror genre, both in literat...

  6. Carol says:

    First published in 1959, there is no doubt about it, PSYCHO is an absolutely great horror classic.If by some freak of nature you happen to be in the dark regarding Robert Bloch s Psycho I will warn you not to go in the shower at the Bates Motel, and be green with envy that you can read the novel with no prior knowledge of the intriguing plot.If you are familiar with Alfred Hitchcock s movie versionreleased in 1960then you will notice two obvious differences when reading the book, the first o First published in 1959, there is no doubt about it, PSYCHO is an absolutely great horror classic.If by some freak of nature you happen to be in the dark regarding Robert Bloch s Psycho I will warn you not to go in the shower at the Bates Motel, and be green with envy that you can read the novel with no prior knowledge of the intriguing plot.If you are familiar with Alfred Hitchcock s mo...

  7. Jaidee says:

    2.5 sensationalistic, dated, a tad ridiculous, entertaining stars OkyesI was mildly entertained while I mostly cringed characters.not well formed.1950s stereotypes writing.written at a grade four level but for adults knowledge of psychopathology.amateurish, outlandish, unbelievable plausibilitylow no make that very lowdespite this I was entertained, mildly entertained but it would have sufficed to have just seen the movie and I have seen it several timesI will not mov 2.5 sensationalistic, dated, a tad ridiculous, entertaining stars OkyesI was mildly entertained while I mostly cringed characters.not well formed.1950s stereotypes writin...

  8. Eve says:

    We re all not quite as sane as we pretend to be I am a great fan of Alfred Hitchcock and his films, but this is the only film that I haven t watchedthan once Sure, that includes a string of other Oscar winners likeShawshank Redemption and Forest Gump I m just a weirdo Psycho really scared me when I was young, though There was no way to explain how the silhouette of mother s chair rocked on its own while Norman was at the hotel I don t like unexplainable things.The novel was actuall We re all not quite as sane as we pretend to be I am a great fan of Alfred Hitchcock and his films, but this is the only film that I haven t watchedthan once Sure, that includes a string of other Oscar winners likeShawshank Redemption and Forest Gump I m just a weirdo Psycho really scared me when I was young, though There was no way to explain how the silhouette of mother s chair rocked on its own while Norman was at the hotel I don t like unexplainable things.The novel was actually really good It was very psychological and Bloch gave the reader a copilot seat into Norman s mind It s not until the very end of the novel that we finally learn everything there is to know about Norman, his complex relationship with his deceased mother, and his questionable choice of reading material.For a novel written in 1959, this must have been pretty out there, but it was based on murderer ...

  9. Mia Nauca says:

    Solo puedo decir que despu s de leer este libro estoy completamente obsesionada con todo lo que tenga que ver con psicosis, la pel cula me encanta y ahora estoy viendo la serie Bates Motel que es I N C R E B L EA pesar de ya saber cual era el plot twist del libro, me enganche desde el principio y lo termin de leer en 3 horas, definitivamente la pel cula es casi igual, excepto que en la novela podemos reconocer a Norman Bates m s como psic pata debido a que tb leemos lo que est pensando todo Solo...

  10. Simona Bartolotta says:

    First, it wasn t a scary as I thought it would be which is a very good thing for me, if you re wondering and secondly, I had foreseen everything that was going to happen at page 10 which, to be honest, is not as good This is, however, not the book s fault, as I see it I believe this is the case of a classic that has become so classic we start to think of it as trite, which in origin it mustn t have been at all It saddens me, obviously, but this phenomenon often occurs with works so great, First, it wasn t a scary as I thought it would be which is a very good thing for me, if you re wondering and secondly, I had fores...